2014 in review

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2014 annual report for this blog.

Here’s an excerpt:

A New York City subway train holds 1,200 people. This blog was viewed about 5,000 times in 2014. If it were a NYC subway train, it would take about 4 trips to carry that many people.

Click here to see the complete report.

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Workload management strategies

In a React world, everything is an event that anybody can grab and process according to whatever its responsibility is. The notion of event allows for very low contract coupling; it acts as a medium between classes. A message is similar, but with more coupling as it aggregates endpoints or endpoints addresses.
This model offers flexible design where events flow and are processed through the systems. But what happens when you have too many events to process?

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Our Devoxx 2014 talk

Our Devoxx 2014 talk

My mate Thomas Pierrain and I were lucky enough to have our topic selected for Devoxx FR 2014. The subject was the presentation of the sequencer and an iterative design exercise for a financial real-time pricing service.

Many thanks to our amazing audience that gave us interesting questions and good feedback. For those who may be interested, the talk can be seen on Parleys in the Devoxx FR channel.

Scrum + Craftsmanship != XP

My previous post, XP revival, dealt with the positive trend around XP as a project methodology. I explicitly stated that adding Craftsmanship practices on top of Scrum does not mean that you’re doing XP. In this post I am going to answer the explicit request to elaborate more on that topic.  It is a well-known fact that Scrum prescribes no engineering practice, leaving teams choosing the ones they see fit. A strategy that led more often than not to what Martin Fowler coined as flaccidscrum, projects which velocity drops to a halt. This situation also contributed to the birth  of the Software Craftsmanship movement, which aims at raising the bar for code engineering practices. It also stresses out that a coder must make those practices his own responsibility.
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